Crested Canary Blog

FosteringANewGenerationInAviculture

Fostering A New Generation In Aviculture

The “face” of aviculture as it appears today is slowly maturing. Sitting in the lecture rooms at the Vegas Pet Expo in February, listening to the speakers and looking around the room at attendees, I was struck by the actuality of this statement. The average age of people in the room appeared to be 40-50, although certainly, some were younger and some older. With few exceptions, the speakers also fell into this same classification. This was a frightening realization. We might assume […]
yellow canary

Are You A True Canary Fan? Hard Feather Vs Soft Feather Quiz

I thought I would try out a fun type canary quiz. Hope you like it. If it becomes popular, I will try to include other fun activities as time goes on. Maybe we could do a contest based on who answers the most correct Canary Trivia answers? Or a fun Canary crossword puzzle. Let me know what you think Yah or Nah!
My Canary Breeding Cage Plans

My Canary Breeding Cage Plans

I have now purchased new show quality breeding stock, consisting of six Red Factors – Lipochromes. (Two Red cocks and four Apricot hens). New Breeding Stock Six pair of Fife Fancies, (I still have some good Fifes in my flights, so I just want some new blood to improve on what I have) One of the new cock Fifes is a Blue-White carrying cinnamon so I will keep good records of him (I keep good records of all my birds:-) and his […]

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Canary Cage Setup - Housing & Equipment

Canary Cage Setup – Housing & Equipment

My Canary Housing Set Up After moving house in 2002, I opted for two separate buildings so the youngsters, when weaned, can be transferred away from their parents, caged individually and the artificial lights brought down earlier to assist the young birds through the molt in preparation for the early shows. First Cabin Here you can see the new accommodation for my stud. The cabin at the back will be used for breeding purposes, containing Eighty plastic cages each around 40cm long, these […]
avian flu

Avian Flu by Malcolm Green

Normal Avian Flu is not much of a threat to aviculture. Every now and again most countries experience an outbreak (you had one in California a couple of years ago). Because it is a devastating disease for the poultry industry, drastic control measures are enforced including culling programmes and the suspension of trade (hence sales) of birds. H1N1 The H5N1 highly pathogenic strain has killed 60 humans in SE Asia though it is actually very difficult for people to catch it without […]
how to cut canary nails

How To Cut Canary Nails

The picture above shows a detail of cutting your canary’s toenails – as long as they are fine-tipped enough to be accurate, you can use any size of scissors or clippers – I use these larger ones because the extra-fine tip allows for better accuracy, while the size makes for easy handling. You should be working in a strong light so that you can make sure that you can see where the end of the quick inside the nail is before you […]

How To Handle A Canary

The picture above shows how to safely hold your canary – it is important that this is done properly because any pressure on the ribs can cause him to have trouble breathing, or even suffocate – his ribs need to be able to expand freely. As this picture shows, you can accomplish this by holding his head, just under the jaw, between two fingers, and curling the rest of your hand lightly around his body, with the wings tucked into the palm […]
This handful of canary eggs, each one from a different hen, shows how they can vary. The colour can range from almost white through the light blues to a darker, almost muddy greenish-blue, and some hens can lay larger or smaller eggs than another hen of the same size. Sometimes there are speckles of a lighter red-brown, or a darker black-brown. While these markings do often tend to cluster on the bigger end of the egg, they can occur anywhere, and indicate that the chick within could show melanistic markings - especially with the more heavily marked eggs.

Canary Eggs

This handful of canary eggs, each one from a different hen, shows how they can vary. The color can range from almost white through the light blues to a darker, almost muddy greenish-blue, and some hens can lay larger or smaller eggs than another hen of the same size. Sometimes there are speckles of a lighter red-brown or a darker black-brown. While these markings do often tend to cluster on the bigger end of the egg, they can occur anywhere and indicate […]
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